Ransomware Can Devastate Your City; Here’s What You Need to Know

Hackers are going to town on municipalities in California and across the country.

Municipalities are popular targets for cybercriminals because most have a variety of services on their websites that requires city residents to share credit card information, addresses and other personally identifying information. Even with the prime data cities store, they often don’t have adequate security solutions in place to prevent ransomware attacks.

Yes, Disaster Recovery Planning is Important – Here’s Why

What’s the worst technology disaster you can imagine hitting your business? An earthquake shattering all your computers, monitors and phones? Hackers stealing all of your customers’ personal information and selling it on the Dark Web? How about your server room catching fire and destroying all communications systems?

All of these and more (let your imagination run wild because it’s probably on the right track) threaten businesses worldwide – including Southern California SMBs. It’s that last one, though – the server room fire – that DiamondIT experienced firsthand with a local business.

5 Cyber Incidents You Need to Know About

1. Thousands of patients exposed in L.A. County Dept. of Health data breach

A recent phishing attack on the Los Angeles County Department of Health released names, addresses, dates of birth and Medi-Cal identification numbers to third-party hackers. Although the county reports there is no evidence at this time that this information is being misused, you should enroll in the provided credit and identity monitoring services being offered.

SMBs: It is possible to check if your company has information for sale on the Dark Web. Once you know if your credentials are compromised, you can act. Sign up for a Free Dark Web Scan here.

The Importance of Data Back Up: Data Management is the Key to Maintaining a Healthy Business

Lately, the news has been rife with tragic stories – from the hurricanes in Florida to the fires in both northern and southern California.  Even when there are not catastrophic natural disasters, cybercrime such as phishing, DDoS attacks and ransomware can ravage a network and compromise your data.

The fact is, today’s organizations both large and small, have lots of important data to store on their networks – and IDC predicts that even smaller organizations can be dealing in petabytes of data in the next few years, much like their larger enterprise counterparts. If a natural disaster or a cybercrime bars access to all that data or destroys on-premise servers, then mission-critical data can be lost forever.